Guillermo Rosas

Associate Professor of Political Science
Director of Undergraduate Studies in Political Science
PHD, Duke University
research interests:
  • Comparative Politics
  • Political Economy
  • Latin American Politics
View All People

contact info:

mailing address:

  • Washington University
  • CB 1063
  • One Brookings Drive
  • St. Louis, MO 63130-4899
image of book cover

Guillermo Rosas' research interests include comparative political economy and legislative politics in Latin America. He teaches courses on Latin American politics, political economy of development, and research methods.

Guillermo Rosas joined the department of Political Science in 2004. His research interests include comparative political economy (politics and finance, determinants of budget deficits, banking crises), legislative politics in Latin America, and teaches courses on Latin American politics, political economy of development, and research methods.

    Curbing Bailouts: Bank Crises and Democratic Accountability in Comparative Perspective

    Curbing Bailouts: Bank Crises and Democratic Accountability in Comparative Perspective

    In this comparative analysis of late-twentieth-century banking crises, Guillermo Rosas identifies political regime type as the determining factor. During a crisis, powerful financial players demand protection of their assets. Rosas maintains that in authoritarian regimes, government officials have little to shield them from such demands and little incentive for rebuffing them, while in democratic regimes, elected officials must weigh these demands against the interests of the voters---that is, the taxpayers. As a result, compared with authoritarian regimes, democratic regimes show a lower propensity toward dramatic, costly bailouts.

    Latin American Party Systems

    Latin American Party Systems

    Political parties provide a crucial link between voters and politicians. This link takes a variety of forms in democratic regimes, from the organization of political machines built around clientelistic networks to the establishment of sophisticated programmatic parties. Latin American Party Systems provides a novel theoretical argument to account for differences in the degree to which political party systems in the region were programmatically structured at the end of the twentieth century. Based on a diverse array of indicators and surveys of party legislators and public opinion, the book argues that learning and adaptation through fundamental policy innovations are the main mechanisms by which politicians build programmatic parties. Marshalling extensive evidence, the book's analysis shows the limits of alternative explanations and substantiates a sanguine view of programmatic competition, nevertheless recognizing that this form of party system organization is far from ubiquitous and enduring in Latin America.